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Archive: Aug 2018

Radical Press Fest

September 15, 12-5pm

You’re invited to an all-day festival of radical books, zines, prints, and more! “The Radical Press Fest”  will bring together publishers working in different genres and on various scales to give a sampling of what radical publishing looks like. Vendors include Common Notions, Radix Media, Justseeds, the Operating System, Interference Archives, Rebozo, Ink Cap Press, EFA Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop Program, and more!

Panel Discussion: Publishing as a Tool of Resistance

Saturday, September 15, 5pm
Organized by Common Notions 

Please join us in conversation as we discuss how publishing can be used as a tool for resistance and movement-building. The Feminist Press Publicity Manager Jisu Kim, The Operating System Founder and Publisher Lynne DeSilva-Johnson, Radix Media Publisher Lantz Arroyo, and El Rebozo Palapa Editorial Publisher Pio will discuss their approach to publishing and the role of independent publishing within building social movements. Moderated by journalist and editor Audrea Lim.

Propaganda Party: Families for Safe Streets

Sunday, September 16, 2-5pm

Interference Archive and Families for Safe Streets (FSS) are excited to collaborate on an upcoming propaganda party to create materials for the World Day of Remembrance, commemorating lives lost in traffic crashes across New York City. Join us on Sunday, September 16th from 2-5pm at Interference Archive (314 7th Street, Brooklyn NY 11225) to make posters, memorial banners, buttons, and more. FSS is comprised of a group of individuals who have lost loved ones or have been injured in traffic crashes. Their mission is to channel grief into action and through grassroots campaigns, help realize a city where pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles safely co-exist.

Beyond the Good Muslim/Bad Muslim Binary: Understanding Islamophobia

Tuesday, September 25, 7-9pm

This interactive workshop asks participants to engage in and question the narratives that frame the way Muslims are talked about in the West. The workshop will use the British context to explain and ask questions about the way pseudoscientific narratives that stem from colonial times are used to justify today’s racist and dehumanising practices by the state in a range of ways. It asks us to consider Islamophobia beyond the individual’s prejudice or “phobia” and more broadly as a formally sustained and encoded way of thinking about certain people as less human than others, justifying systems and apparatuses of surveillance, the unmaking of citizens and (ironically) the jeopardisation of democracy and increasing authoritarianism that threaten’s everybody’s rights.