Exploring the relationship between cultural production and social movements. —Learn More
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Film screening: Finally Got the News

Saturday, May 6, 7pm

Produced in 1970 as a collaboration between Newsreel filmmakers and the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, Finally Got the News paints a picture of race, class, and labor issues in Detroit while exemplifying the ways cinema at the time was used by filmmakers as a means for liberation and a tool for worker struggles. This film screening accompanies Interference Archive’s public exhibition of the same name. We will be joined by Stewart Bird, one of the Newsreel filmmakers involved in this production, as well as by Chris Robé, author of “Detroit Rising: The League of Revolutionary Black Workers, Newsreel, and the Making of Finally Got the News”.

Film Screening: EL PUEBLO SE LEVANTA and A LUTA CONTINUA

Sunday, May 14, 7pm

Celebrate the closing of our current exhibition with us as we watch these two amazing films!

Produced in 1971, El Pueblo Se Levanta portrays the racial discrimination, deficient community services, and poor education and job opportunities faced by Puerto Rican communities in the United States. This film focuses on the community of East Harlem and is narrated by the people it portrays, capturing the compassion and militancy of the Young Lords as they implemented their own health, educational, and public assistance programs and fought back against social injustice.

We will watch this film in conversation with A Luta Continua (1972), which records Mozambican guerillas fighting colonialism in the liberated areas of Mozambique. Filmed by African American lawyer Robert Van Lierop in solidarity with FRELIMO, A Luta Continua gives voice to similar demands for health care, education reform, and gender equality that we hear from the Young Lords in El Pueblo Se Levanta.

sub.Media: ITEOTWAWKIAIFF retrospective

Wednesday, May 3, 7pm

Last December, sub.Media shocked their fans, when they announced that they were pulling the plug on their flagship project “It’s the End of the World as We Know it and I Feel Fine” or ITEOTWAWKIAIFF.
Join us of a retrospective of the best clips from this anarchist video project, and speak directly with one of the show’s creators.

Film screening: People’s Firehouse #1 and Voces de Fillmore

Saturday, March 18, 7-9pm

As part of our reflection on the power of community media making alongside the Finally Got the News exhibition, we are excited to partner with Third World Newsreel for a screening of People’s Firehouse #1 (1979) and Voces de Fillmore (2016). Filmmaker Teresa Basilio will join us to introduce Voces de Fillmore, and to participate with the audience in a conversation about the power communities have to shape their neighborhoods, as well as the potential of community media making to tell the stories of current organizing work.

NOW! Journal presents: Shut It Down!

December 20, 7:30 – 10:30pm

An evening of radical cinema, radical discussion, and radical organizing. A screening of short films by filmmakers who use their work to respond to the political struggles of our present moment.

Curated by: Alex Johnston, Kelly Gallagher, Travis Wilkerson, Kelly Sears, Christopher Harris

Film screening: Joanie4Jackie4Ever

November 4, 7pm and November 5, 7pm

Interference Archive, as part of the exhibition We Are What We Archive, presents Joanie4Jackie4Ever, two nights of screenings and discussions focussed on the Joanie4Jackie project. Joanie4Jackie is a low-fi VHS distribution project of short work by women. Born out of the 1990s cultural movement of Riot Grrrl conventions, punk music, and cheap fanzine production, Joanie4Jackie was developed before the internet and before peer-to-peer file exchange.

WHAT’S THAT FOR? An extended conversation with the Videofreex

WHAT’S THAT FOR? An extended conversation with the Videofreex
October 7, 8, and 9, 2016

The Interference Archive, in conjunction with the Videofreex, Jon Nealon and Jenny Raskin, are presenting a rare opportunity to engage with the seminal video collective. A part of the We Are What We Archive exhibition, which highlights artworks and artists contained in the Interference Archive collection, WHAT’S THAT FOR? is a three-day event of screenings and discussions designed to give people an opportunity to learn about and connect with the diverse activities of the Videofreex project members.

What is Wanted and What is Needed? A Screening & Discussion with Daniel Tucker on Election-Season Future Imaginaries

Saturday, April 2nd, 7pm

Artist, organizer and writer Daniel Tucker will be in town from Philadelphia to share his new feature-length video essay and mine the collection of Interference Archives to facilitate a discussion on the topic of Election-Season Future Imaginaries. This screening and discussion will locate itself initially in the 1970s during Ronald Reagan’s first Presidential run as an occasion to examine the emerging rhetoric of the future as articulated by Reagan in contrast with the futures that were projected by materials found in IA from that time through the present.

Film screening: I Heard it Through the Grapevine

Wednesday, April 13, 7pm

A personal essay film written by James Baldwin and directed by Dick Fontaine and Pat Hartley, I Heard It Through the Grapevine follows writer James Baldwin as he revisits the settings of civil rights struggles of the 1960s in the Deep South and reexamines the movement’s ideals twenty years later. Featuring Amiri Baraka and Chinua Achebe.

Film Program: Whose Native Land?

Thursday, March 10, 7pm

Join us for a special film program featuring award-winning documentary short Native New Yorker (2005) and classic American labor film Native Land (1942).