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  1. Support Interference Archive this season, and send a radical history bundle to your friends!

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    Are you looking for gifts to send to friends this holiday season? We’ve got a solution for you—and you can support Interference Archive at the same time!

    For a donation of $75 to Interference Archive, we’ll send a radical history bundle to someone in the United States on your behalf.


    When you make a donation here:

    We’ll send an email to the email address on your PayPal account to confirm the tote bag color you’d like, and the address you’d like us to ship to (within the US). Or, you can beat us to it! Send us a message to info[at]interferencearchive.org

    Here’s how it works:

    Each bundle includes:

    Questions? Send us an email! And, thanks for supporting Interference Archive this holiday season. We couldn’t do this without you.

  2. Online class visits for the 2020-21 school year: join us (virtually) in the archive!

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    We love having classes visit Interference Archive. It provides us with an easy way to meet our mission of engaging the public with the cultural production of social movements, and we are so grateful for every opportunity to introduce students to a different kind of archive: one where use is a form of preservation; one where multiple forms of knowledge, skill, and experience are valued and shared within non-hierarchical structures; one where everyone is welcomed as an archivist.

    After New York City closed down in March 2020, we were excited to still offer virtual Interference Archive class visits for several groups, and we are looking forward to continuing this work in the coming months. Please reach out to us if you’d like to schedule something!

    For synchronous instruction, we’ll coordinate one or two volunteers to join your regularly scheduled class session. We are happy to meet with you on whatever digital platform you usually use. We can talk about Interference Archive and our own personal experiences as volunteers; offer a virtual tour of our spring 2020 exhibition on the Visual History of the Climate Justice movement; and/or provide a walk-through of our online summer 2020 exhibition Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing. We can also show images and video clips of the archive and its holdings, and lead a discussion of archival material related to topics intersecting with your curriculum. 

    For asynchronous instruction, we’re able to share a recorded presentation about our work, a virtual tour of our Visual History of the Climate Justice movement exhibition, or an activity to guide students through the online exhibition Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing. We can also share reading material about Interference Archive, and we’re happy to provide questions for students to respond to in some kind of written or creative format.

    Would you like a virtual class visit with Interference Archive? Please take a moment to share some info with us via this online form: https://forms.gle/vfuMAxe3uQhgXRcb9.  We’ll follow up with you by email within a week.

  3. Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing

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    Now online! Visit walkout.interferencearchive.org

    May 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the Kent State and Jackson State massacres, which set off a historically large-scale student strike across the nation. With the anniversary as an entry point and frame of reference, Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing uses archival material from the Interference Archive collection—posters, buttons, pamphlets, flyers, zines, and more—to examine the broader scope of student movements that both led up to and followed in the wake of May 1970.   

    From its roots in the changes wrought by World War II  through the civil rights  and anti-war movements  of the 1960s, Walkout traces major themes that led American students to strike in 1970 and that have propelled them since, with reference to international movements that influenced tactics and issues for agitation. Of significant note is the way that the graphic production of these movements helps us trace the impact of movements across generations: Walkout showcases material from student art collectives communicating their demands through visual material, including the Atelier Populaire (Paris, 1968), Poster Factory (Wisconsin, 1970), WIMP Collective (New York, 1970), Sublevarte Colectivo (Mexico, 1999), and École de la Montagne Rouge (Montreal, 2012).

    Thumbnail image: Detail from Student as Nigger, Social Revolutionary Anarchist Federation, New York, 1966.

  4. Exhibition Catalog: Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing

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    publication cover

    May 2020 marked the 50th anniversary of the Kent State and Jackson State massacres, which set off a historically large-scale student strike across the nation. With the anniversary as an entry point and frame of reference, this 96-page full color publication uses posters, buttons, pamphlets, flyers, zines, and more—to examine the broader scope of student movements that both led up to and followed those of May 1970.

    Based on Interference Archive’s online exhibition of the same name, Walkout: A Brief History of Student Organizing focuses on how student organizing emerged in the post-World War II era as the avenue through which postwar generations could participate in public dialogue and critique existing systems, becoming voices of change. Organized by decade, materials in this publication focus on student organizing in the United States but make reference a the broader global context of student protests in France, Brazil, Japan, Mexico, and Canada.

    Order your copy now! Unfortunately we can only provide domestic shipping at this point; stay tuned for international shipping options soon.

    The preorder buttons below provide the option to pay through Paypal or with a credit card.

    The materials in this publication reflect the holdings of Interference Archive, as well as material on loan from the private collection of Dennis O’Neil. They are in no way encyclopedic in scope but are instead a sampling of the textual and visual culture of student organizing.

    View sample pages below:

  5. Survivors Issue #4 Virtual Launch!

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    Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 6:30 PM – 8 PM

    Co-hosted with Survived & Punished New York

    Register via the zoom link: bit.ly/ArchivingAbolition

    Together, Survived and Punished NY and Audio Interference, a podcast produced by Interference Archive, present Archiving Abolition. Join us on Wednesday September 30 @ 6:30pm for our listening party to celebrate the launch of Archiving Abolition, a podcast series collaboration from our two organizations as well as issue #4 of “Free:Survivors”, Survived & Punished NY’s inside-outside newsletter.

    Throughout Archiving Abolition, you’ll hear interviews and spoken word from Survived & Punished comrades on the inside, their loved ones, and supporters advocating for their freedom and the abolition of the prison industrial complex. Come to Archiving Abolition to hear excerpts from the series and roundtable conversations about the importance of archival work, the conditions comrades face on the inside, current S&P campaigns, and how to get involved.

    Hear from Survived & Punished NY’s Editorial Collective members about their process of creating “Free : Survivors,” as they read and share Issue 4 content, and learn more about the fight to free criminalized survivors! 

    Listen to clips of Audio Interference’s newest series of podcast episodes, which includes an interview with Survived & Punished volunteers and a selection of stories from comrades inside. This podcast series will debut alongside Survived & Punished’s most recent abolitionist newsletter.

    There will be Spanish and ASL interpretation during the event.

    Our comrades at Survived & Punished (S&P) are accepting donations if you’re unable to attend but want to support their work: https://www.paypal.me/SPNYnewsletter

    Survived & Punished (S&P) is a coalition of defense campaigns and grassroots groups committed to eradicating the criminalization of survivors of domestic and sexual violence and the culture of violence that contributes to it. The all-volunteer organization includes community organizers, survivor advocates, legal experts, and policy advocates including currently and formerly incarcerated survivors. www.survivedandpunishedny.org

    Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in an open stacks archival collection, publications, a study center, and public programs including exhibitions, workshops, talks, and screenings. www.interferencearchive.org

    Audio Interference is a podcast produced by Interference Archive. The podcast is about social movements past and present. We explore the connections between art, design, activism, and politics. Launched in 2015, Audio Interference features interviews with people who were witnesses to some of the most important moments of the recent past, such as the 1999 WTO protests in Seattle, Indigenous struggles for land rights, abolition, labor organizing among adjunct professors, struggles over housing and gentrification, and more. www.audiointerference.org

    Graphic: Paula King

  6. Virtual Multispecies Care Circle

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    Saturday, May 9, 4-5pm

    To join the Virtual Multispecies Care Circle please RSVP by email to: environmentalperformanceagency@gmail.com.

    As we shield our breath from the virus, what does it mean to seek sharing breath with other species? How does the temporary pause of the pandemic provide an opportunity for us to sense the web of relations of breathing and air quality?

    Join the EPA’s  first Multispecies Care Circle to dive into these questions. This virtual get together deepens engagement with the EPA’s Multispecies Care Survey, a public data gathering initiative meant to provoke and articulate forms of environmental agency that de-center human supremacy and facilitate the co-generation of embodied, localized plant-human care practices. As the formats of coexistence are shifted by social distancing, we ask “In a time of pandemic crisis, how do we re-value what care means for all living beings?”

    Multispecies Care Circle – Keep Lungs Active is the first of a series of care circles hosted as part of the Multispecies Care Survey. Participants are invited to engage with “Protocol 03: Keep Lungs Active,” a prompt to experience air quality and exchange with other life forms. Hosted in collaboration with Interference Archive and invited guest Nora Almeida, this care circle will explore EPA’s new participatory project through the lens of archiving multispecies environmental attunement and the correlation to environmental rollbacks instituted during the pandemic.  

    We invite participants to try out the Keep Lungs Active Protocol prior to the Care Circle and bring along any notes or reflections. 

    EPA’s Multispecies Care Survey was launched April 20th, 2020, as part of Regeneration in Place, a program by Old Stone House. 

    The Environmental Performance Agency (EPA) is an artist collective founded in 2017 and named in response to the ongoing rollback of Federal environmental policy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Appropriating the acronym EPA, the collective’s primary goal is to shift thinking around the terms environment, performance, and agency – using artistic, social, and embodied practices to advocate for the agency of all living performers co-creating our environment, specifically through the lens of spontaneous urban plants, native or migrant. Current EPA Agents include Catherine Grau, andrea haenggi, Ellie Irons, Christopher Kennedy, and spontaneous urban plants.

    Nora Almeida is a writer, librarian, and environmental / labor activist. She’s has volunteered at Interference Archive since 2015 and works at the New York City College of Technology (CUNY). 

  7. Virtual Exhibition Tour: Like the Waters We Rise

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    Were you hoping to visit our exhibit, Climate Justice in Print, in spring 2020? We’re excited to share this video of a virtual tour, curator’s talk and discussion hosted by our friends at Naturally Occurring Cultural Districts NY through their Peer Learning Exchange program.

    Thank you to Raquel de Anda, Caron Atlas, Emily Ahn Levy, Tom Oseau, Nadine Bloch and Ceci Pineda for helping to organize and taking part! Big thanks to all the activists and community members who joined us to share their own experiences and expertise.

  8. Virtual Class Visits: the next frontier

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    We love having classes visit Interference Archive. It provides us with an easy way to meet our mission of engaging the public with the cultural production of social movements, and we are so grateful for every opportunity to introduce students to a different kind of archive: one where use is a form of preservation; one where multiple forms of knowledge, skill, and experience are valued and shared within non-hierarchical structures; one where everyone is welcomed as an archivist.

    It was really hard for us to cancel upcoming class visits when we closed our doors mid-March. We miss you all! We’ve watched as education institutions transition to online instruction, and we’re eager as a community archive to support that continued learning. Please let us know if we can provide a virtual class visit for you and your students.

    For synchronous instruction, we’ll coordinate one or two volunteers to join your regularly scheduled class session. We can offer a virtual tour of our current exhibition on the Visual History of the Climate Justice movement and talk about Interference Archive and our own personal experiences as volunteers. We can also show images and video clips of the archive and its holdings, and lead a discussion related to topics intersecting with your curriculum. 

    For asynchronous instruction, we’re able to share a recorded presentation about our work and a virtual tour of our current exhibition on the Visual History of the Climate Justice movement. We can also share reading material about Interference Archive, and we’re happy to provide questions for students to respond to in some kind of written or creative format.

    Would you like a virtual class visit with Interference Archive? Please reach out to us at classes@interferencearchive.org and let us know:

    • Does your class meet synchronously or asynchronously?
    • If you meet synchronously, what dates would you like a visit, and what online instruction platform are you using?
    • What is your class studying, and what would you like your students to get out of a virtual class with Interference Archive?
    • We usually rely on financial donations to Interference Archive for class visits as a sizable portion of our income. Would your institution be able to make a donation to the Archive? We can provide invoices and receipts as needed.

  9. Interference Archive’s Response to COVID19

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    March 11, 2020: In solidarity with our community and those most vulnerable, we are doing our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by temporarily shutting our door. All events currently scheduled are postponed—we’re hopeful to get them back on the schedule in the very near future.

    We are taking this precaution because it’s been shown that slowing the progress of COVID-19 is imperative to our ability to take care of those impacted, and decreasing exposure is an effective way to do that.

    We are currently talking through the best ways to practice community care while our space is closed. Today and always, we stand in solidarity against xenophobia and racism being wielded.

    We stand in solidarity with the immunocompromised, people with disabilities, those without access to healthcare, and those without access to leave.

    If you have questions we ask that you please reach out via our email info@interferencearchive.org

    (artwork by @toosphexy via @justseeds )

  10. Climate Justice Wikipedia Editathon

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    UPDATE: this event will be online-only

    Join us to increase representation of environmental issues on Wikipedia, inspired by our exhibition, A Visual History of Climate Justice. Please note: this event will take place online only, but you can still join organizers March 11th from 6 to 9pm in editing.

    No experience editing Wikipedia is required! Check out our Wikipedia meetup page for more info, including training videos on how to get started.

    Contact us with questions at info@interferencearchive.org.

    Image: By Megs – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57963619